Holstee, the NYC based eco-friendly design shop, have been at it again. They recently created a minimalist designed wallet ($25) that is not only perfect for carrying your essentials ; credit cards, cash, and sliding window for your ID or transit card, but also fits within their ethos of design with a conscience. Each wallet is constructed from recycled plastic bags and newspapers collected from the streets of Delhi. Each is a one-of-a-kind in its pattern and style. From colored ads, cartoons, headline news, and classifieds no two wallets are the same.

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Working with a family-run non-profit based in India that works to collect and recycle litter off the streets of Delhi, Holstee was able to create the dream wallet. This vegan wallet is made primarily of plastic bags and newspapers, collected off the Streets of Delhi in India. Production of this wallet helps reduce waste in Delhi, provides fair wage employment and subsidizes healthcare and education for each employee’s family.

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Stop
In January 2007, I spent 3 weeks criss-crossing India in an autorickshaw. For those of you familiar with this splendid vehicle, it’s a 3-wheeled, motorized rickshaw, much like a moped with a windshield and canvas roof.

It was an incredible way to see the country. While trying to stay alive, I couldn’t help but marvel at the roadway artwork.If an Indian vehicle hauls anything – from hay to humans – it is decorated to the fullest degree. Trucks, taxis, rickshaws, pedi-taxis, even ox carts, are covered stem to stern in slogans, initials, pictographs, floral designs and stripes. Usually all at once. No space is left untouched. Even the windshields are bespangled until the barest minimum space is left to operate the vehicle to a passable degree.

Stop

Taxis and trucks in particular have the word “Stop” painted on the lower left corner of the rear. It’s a plea really, for whatever is behind them, to pay close attention and at the slightest provocation, slam on the brakes.This book has examples of this “functional,” outsider art, with some other road images tossed in.

STOP— Anthony P. Munoz

apmunoz.com